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The Canadian Institute of Plumbing and Heating (CIPH) has raised a number of concerns with authorities in Vancouver, B.C., over proposed low carbon and energy efficiency updates to the city's by-law for low-rise residential buildings (under four storeys). Of particular concern to CIPH is the speed at which the city is hoping to implement these changes. It has set a target date of 2025 for all new and replacement heating and hot water systems in low-rise buildings within the city to be zero emissions. With just five years for the changes to be implemented, a real concern of the industry body, articulated in a letter sent to the Gil Kelley, Vancouver's general manager of Planning, Urban Design, and Sustainability, is that by removing consumer options and creating affordability issues, some heating retrofits may be driven to the underground economy. It also doesn't believe the industry, including manufacturers, has been given enough time to react to such sweeping change. While authorities in Vancouver have stated that it envisages heat pumps playing an important role in reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), CIPH has also highlighted why it believes that technology is not suitable in all cases and why it may not meet the needs of all buildings or all residents. Ralph Suppa, president and general manager of CIPH, was also critical of Vancouver's “complete lack of consultation with the plumbing and heating industry” before proposing these changes. “CIPH would like to see the COV keep options open for consumers with their heating systems, especially with retrofit systems. By eliminating fossil fuel equipment, consumer choice will be severely limited and we foresee issues with affordability and safety,” says Suppa. “The updates being proposed to the 2021 Vancouver Building By-Law leave very little time for the industry to react. Manufacturers, distributors and contractors will all have issues with the [...]
Mon, Dec 09, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
IPEX, the Quebec-headquartered manufacturer of thermoplastic piping systems, has celebrated the opening of its Stockton Distribution Centre in the Central Valley of California. The new facility nearly quadruples IPEX's available warehouse space in the region as it continues to expand south of the border. “We listened to our customers and identified an opportunity to grow our presence on the west coast, by building this facility,” says Travis Lutes, president & COO of IPEX. “We constantly explore ways to offer our customers an exceptional experience and that includes the ability to supply their needs in a timely and expedient manner.” Lutes added, “In addition, this new facility has allowed us to double our employee base and solidify our commitment to the local community.” ipexna.com [...]
Mon, Dec 09, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
Fri, Dec 06, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
By Adam Freill In trying to find a few words that capture the essence of what has made Roger Grochmal a pillar of the Canadian mechanical industry for the past 45 years, terms like hard work, dedication and caring come easily to mind, but it is his willingness to share that stands out the most. A contributor to every edition of Mechanical Business since Day 1, Grochmal has always been willing to share the knowledge that he and his team at AtlasCare, a mechanical contracting firm located west of Toronto, put into serving their customers. “There are no unique secrets in this industry. If you look on the internet, it's all there,” he explained during a recent chat at his office in Oakville, Ont. “It is not the knowledge; it is the ability to implement that knowledge. Failure to implement is what hurts companies.” Of course, there will be some company owners who are able to implement some of the systems and ideas that he is more than willing to discuss, and Roger is very good with that. “Canada is a big country, and there is plenty of room for good contractors to operate. I would always want to operate in a market where my competitors know what they are doing,” he says. “If they understand their cost structure, price their work properly, and hire and train quality people, it is good for all of us.” Finding an escape When Roger isn't filling his time at the office, a conference or industry event, you might find him sketching, painting, reading or out on a golf course or in a river. He's a member of a fly-fishing club on the Beaver River, near Thornbury, Ont., and does his best to get on a river whenever an opportunity, and season, presents itself. “I fish all over the place,” admits the avid [...]
Fri, Dec 06, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
By Denise Deveau It's not easy to maintain or upgrade an underground hydrothermal system, but sometimes an opportunity comes up that helps the cause. Located on the water in B.C., Inn at Laurel Point in Victoria has long been at the forefront of sustainable operations, including its hydrothermal infrastructure that draws ocean water to run part of the property's cooling systems, says Ian Powell, managing director. “We've always been ahead of the curve,” he says. “Almost 30 years ago we became one of the first in the country to have one.” The two-pipe system that runs from the harbour to the inn's Arthur Erickson wing has done its work in supporting the property's carbon neutral goals. But in the fall of 2018, they had a unique opportunity to take a closer look at what they had, and to improve upon it. That's when Transport Canada launched a nearby soil remediation project that would open up the system for all to see. “Because they also had to dig up the property around the hotel, it was an ideal opportunity to upgrade the system, streamline maintenance and reduce our energy bills even further,” Powell says. “The technology and understanding of these systems has moved a lot in 30 years. We were able to be far more scientific than last time. At the same time we realized we could put a plan in place for future sustainability.” A New Beginning “We knew Transport Canada was doing site remediation on property that fronted the inn,” says Sarah Campden, associate with Herold Engineering Limited in Victoria. “Part of that meant removing the hydrothermal pipes running the system. The other was demolishing the existing salt water pond because the remediation would be taking the soil to the bedrock layer.” Given that everything would be completely exposed, it made sense to not only assess their [...]
Fri, Dec 06, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
By Mark and Alexandra Parliament While writing this article, we have the windows in our home open to let in the crisp autumn air, giving us plenty of natural ventilation. Each year, as we fall into winter's grip, however, our windows close and our indoor air quality has a tendency to falter. Thirty years ago, this would not have posed much of a problem as older homes are not sealed like the houses today. These older structures allowed for natural air changes to occur, which would flush out adverse air quality in our homes. In our attempts to make buildings as energy efficient as possible, newer building techniques and product technologies have created increasingly air-tight homes. The downside to this is that we tend to trap more Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), Respirable Suspended Particulates (RSPs) and water vapour, all of which can contribute to poor Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). Acceptable strategies for improving the IAQ for your clients depends on where in the country they reside or work. An exhaust- only approach is still being used in some provinces, whereas other provinces mandate the use of an HRV or ERV by code. Ventilation: The process of “changing” or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality. Radon A radioactive gas that comes from the breakdown of uranium in soil and rock, radon is invisible, odourless and tasteless. When released from the ground into the outdoor air, it is diluted and is not a concern. In enclosed spaces, like homes, however, it can accumulate to high levels and become a health risk. While present in all areas of Canada, concentration levels will vary from region to region and house to house. The only way to be sure of the radon level in a home is to conduct a radon test. An Exhausted Approach [...]
Fri, Dec 06, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
By Danny Timmins While today's global marketplace is heavily technology dependant, and we all rely on technology for business and personal activities, the human factor is still the biggest risk to any person's, company's or organization's digital security, and the bad guys know it. As a result, the people who want your information are engaging in social engineering tactics to target system users, many of whom fall prey on any given day. Recent statistics tell us that phishing accounts for 90 per cent of all data breaches, and that close to four per cent of the population will click on an attachment or link, no matter what the circumstances. Perhaps this is due to simple curiosity, or a lack of training, but the sophistication of modern phishing and social engineering emails has made it considerably more difficult to detect fraudulent attempts to infiltrate our digital worlds. I am part of a team of security experts that has the ability to craft a phishing campaign that will achieve, on average, a 35 per cent hit rate of an organization's employees clicking on a link. Of those who click, anywhere from 10 to 15 per cent will usually provide us with credentials – their user names and passwords. In a real situation, this is all the hackers need to download malware and gain access to an organization's system without the user being aware that they have opened the cyber door for them. Similarly, phishing via public Wi-Fi is a proven way to target users to gain access to an organization. Why the LAX View? The main reason why so many people and organizations do not place the necessary emphasis on cyber security, is because it is not a physical affront. Psychologically, if we feel that something is going to happen physically, we feel vulnerable. In the cyber world, everything is silent. Imagine [...]
Fri, Dec 06, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
ASHRAE Learning Institute (ALI) will offer 21 courses during the 2020 ASHRAE Winter Conference and AHR Expo in Orlando, Fla. The conference will be held from February 1 to 5, 2020, and the Expo runs from February 3 to 5. ALI will offer four full-day seminars and 17 half-day short courses between Saturday, February 1 and Tuesday, February 4, during the conference. New ALI courses include: Guideline 36: Best in Class HVAC Control Sequences Save 40% by Complying with Standard 90.1-2019 Best Practices for Installing DDC Systems IgCC and ASHRAE Standard 189.1 Technical Provisions Principles of Building Commissioning: ASHRAE Guideline 0 and Standard 202 Designing for Cold Climates V in HVAC – What, Why, Where, How, and How Much Full conference course schedule:Feb. 1, 2020 Commercial Building Energy Audits (6 Hour), Jim Kelsey, Member ASHRAE, BEAP, LEED AP Commissioning Process in New and Existing Buildings (6 Hour), Richard Casault, P.E., Member ASHRAE Integrated Building Design (6 Hour), Mitchell Swann, P.E., Member ASHRAE Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Applications: Best Practice (3 Hour), Paul Pieper, Eng., Member ASHRAE Feb. 2, 2020 Guideline 36: Best in Class HVAC Control Sequences (3 Hour), Steven Taylor, P.E., Fellow/Life Member ASHRAE Humidity Control I: Design Tips and Traps (3 Hour), Mark Nunelly, P.E., Member ASHRAE, Cx, LEED AP Laboratory Design: The Basics and Beyond (3 Hour), John Varley, P.E., Member ASHRAE, HBDP, LEED AP Latest in High-Performance Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems (DOAS) (3 Hour), Art Hallstrom, P.E., Fellow/Life Member ASHRAE, BEMP Feb. 3, 2020 Advanced Designs for Net Zero Buildings (3 Hour), Charles Eley, P.E., AIA, BEMP, CEM, Member ASHRAE, LEED AP Designing and Operating High-Performing Healthcare HVAC Systems (3 Hour), Dan Koenigshofer, P.E., Member ASHRAE, HFDP, MSPH High-Performance Building Design: Applications and Future Trends (3 Hour), Tom Lawrence, Ph.D., P.E., Fellow ASHRAE, LEED AP Solar PV and Thermal Systems Analysis and Design (3 Hour), Khalid Nagidi, Member ASHRAE, LEED AP and Svein Morner, Ph.D., Member ASHRAE Save 40% by Complying with [...]
Fri, Dec 06, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
To mark International Day of Persons with Disabilities on December 3, Ottawa International was presented with the Accessibility Certified Gold rating under the Rick Hansen Foundation Accessibility Certification (RHFAC) program. RHFAC is the first program to rate meaningful access, based upon the holistic user experience of people with varying disabilities affecting their mobility, vision and hearing. To date, over 1,200 buildings have been rated through the program. Mark Laroche, president and CEO of the Ottawa International Airport Authority, said, “The airport terminal, which opened in 2003, was built with accessibility in mind. We are delighted to have achieved this exceptional level of certification which is a tribute to the authority's commitment to an accessible terminal for all passengers, employees and visitors.” RHFAC is a program that rates the level of meaningful access in commercial, institutional and multi-residential buildings and sites, offering a snapshot of each site's current level of accessibility. For the Ottawa airport, notable accessibility features include universal washrooms with accessible features and roll-up, automatic drinking fountains. rickhansen.com [...]
Thu, Dec 05, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
The Buildings Show once again brings the best of the construction industry together under one roof for three days in Toronto from Wednesday. This year's show at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre has a particular focus on technology innovations and transformation influencers, carrying the theme through across all market sectors of the Show, including Construct Canada and PM Expo in the convention's South Building and HomeBuilder and Renovator Expo and World of Concrete Toronto Pavilion in the North Building. “With the rapid advancement of technology in the design, construction and management of the built environment, The Buildings Show has recognized the need for these conversations,” says Nancy Milani, of show organizers Informa Markets. “Buildings Connect is designed to connect the entire spectrum of Proptech from design and construction to property management to accelerate innovation and transformation for all types of buildings.” Through new exhibits and features, as well as a comprehensive educational program with skill-building seminars and workshops, attendees will see first-hand how innovative ideas and forward-thinking technology is directly impacting tenants, buildings, design, portfolios, energy use and operational efficiencies within the built environment. The show runs until Friday, December 6. thebuildingsshow.com [...]
Wed, Dec 04, 2019
Source: Mechanical Business
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